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Everything You Should Know about Anti-Vibration Gloves

Specialised Protective gloves are a requirement for different kinds of workplace tasks and for various industrial activities. Until recently, when working with power tools, vibrating machinery or pneumatically driven impact tools, general foam cell padded palm anti-vibration gloves have been considered to be the best Hand Arm Vibration (HAV) protection you can provide. However, the very latest scientific research is uncovering the ‘one glove fixes all’ misconception.

PIP Aust, a wholesale glove Designer and Importer has established a partnership with Swedish Specialised Textile manufacturers Eureka Safety AB for distribution of their unique Frequency Tuned Vibration Reducing glove range.

The unique ‘Eureka’ Impact Vibration reducing gloves are specifically designed to absorb the exact ‘wave band oscillations’ emitting from each tool or machine being operated. These emissions are measured in Frequency (Hertz) and are linked to the revolutions (RPM) each piece of equipment is operating at.

It is important to note the current global Workplace Vibration Standards guidelines are based on studies from the 1970’s. During this time, tool / machinery and material / manufacturing technologies have advanced dramatically. Exhaustive studies throughout the last 3 years, have confirmed that each type of “vibration reducing” material and its specific construction method will provide a vastly different range of vibration absorbing effectiveness.

If you frequently operate equipment and tools with very high impact or very high frequency vibration (400+ Hertz), then you’ll need to protect yourself with a different Vibration absorbing material glove in order to avoid the risk of developing hand-arm vibration syndrome.

In Lower Impact or Lower revving (-400 Hertz) tools and machinery, the vibration absorbing material must provide differing characteristic and so a different glove will be required to protect your arms and hands from a serious condition known as HAVS (hand-arm vibration syndrome). HAVS is also known as white finger syndrome. It was categorized as a secondary form of Raynaud’s phenomenon.

It is now becoming understood, that at very low frequencies (below 200 Hertz) that having any vibration absorption material in the fingers of the glove will actually increase the potential for damage to the wearer’s fingers over time. This occurs due to the amplification of the vibration via the action of the padding material at the fingers.

Anti-vibration gloves are an essential piece of your P.P.E kit if you work with power, air tools or any kind of vibrating machinery. Below you can find some examples of equipment and power tools which may cause HAVS:

  • Grinders
  • Chainsaws
  • Sanders
  • Power drills,
  • Pneumatic drills
  • Impact wrenches
  • Jackhammers and more.

Anti-vibration gloves should be used by workers in industries such as:

  • Auto repair
  • Quarrying
  • Construction
  • Engineering
  • Agriculture, and more.

Hand-arm syndrome is a very serious condition which affects the muscles, blood vessels, joints and nerves in the arms, wrists and hands. Injuries usually occur at frequencies between 5-2000 Hz.

How to reduce risks?

If you operate High revving air tools or heavy vibrating machinery, you should make sure to keep wearing the correct Frequency Reducing gloves. This can be a great help in reducing HAV damage, so take the time to understand the RPM and / or the Hertz output of each tool to be used and match this with the correct glove. Wear them every time you operate any kind of vibrating machinery. These gloves are used to block the amount of damaging frequency vibration transmission from impact powered tools and protect you from the negative health consequences which are associated with exposure to vibration.

An interesting point for our Cold weather States down south. Anti-vibration gloves that keep your hands warm in Cold environments, will improve your blood flow, which is very beneficial when operating heavy vibrating machinery. Ensuring a healthy blood circulation is crucial in this kind of work, in order to avoid any kind of health issues.

Anti-vibration gloves in combination with high quality reduced vibration emission tools will make your work experience much more comfortable, and more importantly, safer than ever.

Now that you have an update and know a little more about anti-vibration science, selecting the correct work gloves and all the risks which may occur if you don’t use them wisely. It’s time to take the next step and look up more information contact us at pipaus.com, to ensure that you get the latest scientifically proven high quality ‘Frequency Tuned’ safety gloves for you and your employees.

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Electricial Maintenance Safety Gloves.… a new design for Arc Flash protection, assurance and finger-tip feel.

A high-quality pair of safety gloves should offer the first line of defense against a variety of hazards. Not many other occupations require such precise contact work as in electrical trades. PIP Aust, a wholesale glove Designer and Importer has established a partnership with Swedish Specialised Textile glove manufacturers Eureka Safety AB for distribution of their unique Class leading Flame Retardant and Arc Flash glove range.

These close fitting FR / Arc Flash protection gloves provide the highest level Cut Resistance, grip, feel, comfort and sensitivity that has not been possible until now. What this means is that tasks such as commercial switchboard maintenance can be undertaken with a high degree of precise dexterity, improving safety and productivity.

A spokesperson for PIP Aust said “There are many (lower voltage) applications for these new technology High Flash Point protection gloves which to now, have been approached with the traditional 3 glove process or even at times with no gloves at all due to the bulkiness of the 3 glove programme.”

The new Eureka 13-4 HFR /AF gloves are not to take the place of Voltage insulating gloves. More so they can be worn over the High Voltage Rubber glove instead of the traditional Cow or Dear Hide outer rigger glove. This will greatly enhance the Wet Grip and contact control for the wearer.

The gloves can be worn independently for working around deenergized switchboards or equipment where there is a risk assessment probability that contact arc flash could occur. Obviously, these gloves are to be utilized in conjunction with Heat FR / AF resistant Face Visor and appropriate upper torso garment protection coverage.

Classification of Electrical Safety Gloves

By nature of profession, electricians can work either with or around, live electrical currents. In other words, they can be at risk of electrical shock, also known as electrocution. Hands are the closest part of the body to the electrical work zone, so wearing the correct hand protection is of utmost importance.

Furthermore, there are certain design, care, and use guidelines that all electricians should follow to ensure hand protection during electrical work is adequate and in suitable working order.

Electrical safety gloves are classified by the voltage protection level they provide and whether they offer ozone resistance or not. The classification of electrical safety gloves based on their voltage protection levels is the following:

  • Class 00 – maximum use voltage of 500 volts AC, proof tested to 2,500 volts AC and 10,000 volts DC
  • Class 0 – maximum use voltage of 1,000 volts AC, proof tested to 5,000 volts AC and 20,000 volts DC
  • Class 1 – maximum use voltage of 7,500 volts AC, proof tested to 10,000 volts AC and 40,000 volts DC
  • Class 2 – maximum use voltage of 17,000 volts AC, proof tested to 20,000 volts AC and 50,000 volts DC
  • Class 3 – maximum use voltage of 26,500 volts AC, proof tested to 30,000 volts AC and 60,000 volts DC
  • Class 4 – maximum use voltage of 36,000 volts AC, proof tested to 40,000 volts AC and 70,000 volts DC

Maintenance of Electrical Safety Gloves

Remember that you must maintain and keep your work gloves in a safe condition. Plus, before you use your gloves, you should thoroughly inspect them for any contamination debris like moisture, metal particles or damage like pinholes, material (aging) fatigue tears, rips, etc.

What’s more, make sure that your safety gloves are electronically tested every six months. And, if you are using rubber insulating gloves, air testing should be part of your regular inspection.

Now that you have a refresher on electrical insulation gloves and the all new installation / maintenance Eureka Heat FR / AF gloves, you can check out more information at www.pipaus.com to ensure you’re getting ‘protection for life’.

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Tips for Choosing the Right Cut-Resistant Gloves

Are your employees at higher risk of getting cuts? If yes, you should definitely get in touch with a professional glove supplier, such as PIP Aus, and protect your workers from getting injured.

Wearing the right cut-resistant gloves in the workplace is of utmost importance if you want to remain safe and in no danger of being affected by cuts. There are various factors that can help you determine the type of gloves needed for the job at hand. Therefore, let’s have a look at some useful tips for choosing the right cut-resistant gloves:

  1. Determine the Level of Cut Resistance Needed

There are different cut-resistant ratings that you should be familiar with. You should also bear in mind that purchasing gloves with the highest level of cut resistance doesn’t always mean that your workers will get the highest level of safety. In other words, get the appropriate cut resistance level for the job at hand. So, let’s have a look at the 9 ANSI cut resistance levels and the different types of protection they offer:

There are different cut-resistant ratings that provide a reference for better matching the most suitable glove to the potential hazard. You should also bear in mind that purchasing gloves with the highest level of cut resistance doesn’t always mean that your workers will get the highest level of Productivity or correct fit and feel for the task. In other words, get the appropriate cut resistance level for the job provides you with the best grip and control at the most appropriate cost. So, let’s have a look at the new ISO 13997 cut resistance levels and the different types of protection they offer:

  • Level A – Low Nuisance cuts (material handling, paper cuts)
  • Level B – Moderate cut hazards (small parts handling, warehouse, construction, forestry, packaging, general purpose)
  • Level C & D – High cut hazards (glass and bottle handling, manufacturing, electrical, dry walling, automotive assembly, roof fixing, metal handling, canning)
  • Level E – Extreme cut hazards (sharp metal stamping, automotive, meat processing, metal recycling, milling steel, pulp and paper)
  • Level F – Ultra High cut hazards (glass and window manufacturing, metal recycling and fabrication, automotive, sharp metal stamping, butchering, oil and gas, industrial pipe fitting, steel cable handling, sheet metal)

As a bonus, if you need to check specifics in the new EN388:2016 levels click here to find out more

  1. Consider the Materials Needed

Glove manufacturers use different materials when producing cut-resistant gloves from cotton to Kevlar. However, this also means that different materials offer different cut resistance levels.

For example, leather offers almost no protection unless the gloves include a cut-resistant liner. Next, cotton offers a bit more cut resistance compared to leather, but it isn’t really the right material for glove safety.

If you want to get gloves with high cut and abrasion resistance levels, you should seek for gloves made of Kevlar or Dyneema. And, if you’re looking for something superior, search for gloves made from either of these two but enhanced with steel fibers.

So, determine which material or combination will be best suitable for your industry because all-purpose gloves don’t exist. What’s best for one workplace might not be the ideal choice for yours.

  1. Try out Several Styles

Finding the perfect cut-resistant gloves for your company might seem like an easy task, but it actually might take a bit longer. Why? Because even if the gloves are made of the right material and offer the right level of cut resistance, your workers might not feel comfortable wearing them, or they might feel either hot or cold.

Therefore, it is best to get a few different styles and ask your crew to test them. Now, don’t think this would be just a waste of time; once the testing period ends, you can provide your workers with the right pair of gloves and ensure they do their best at work.